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    Many of us hesitate to boldly use color in our homes, particularly when it comes to big-ticket items like sofas or appliances. Audacious wallpaper or vivid paint hues? Forget about it. We’re afraid of making expensive mistakes, fearful a trendy shade will come and go before the paint dries or the sofa gets its first spill.

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    The goal was immediately clear when Tina Wolff and Lauren Berry of Wolff Interiors were asked to design this elegant 3,000-square-foot condo residence: to create a sleek and simple space that would allow their clients’ spectacular artwork and custom architectural details to take center stage.

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    Modern vs. Contemporary: When you ask most people the difference between modern and contemporary design, they draw a blank. While the two design styles are easy to confuse, there’s one easy way to tell the difference: the age of the style itself. Modern design appeared in the early 20th century and follows more concrete design guidelines. Contemporary refers to whatever is current in design, focusing on new and innovative ideas. Many designers aiming for a contemporary home will use references to the modern interior design style mixed with new advancements.

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    Cozy blankets, games, coasters and more are easily hidden away in a stylish storage ottoman.

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    Quietly tucked within a quaint bedroom community in Illinois—just 20 minutes from the energetic pulse of St. Louis—Gaye and Barry Julian’s elegant home integrates so seamlessly with its surroundings it looks as though it’s been there for years. A surprising new build completed in 2019 after three and a half years of construction, the house blends as exquisitely with the natural landscape as it does the charming neighborhood scenery.

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    When interior designer Tamsin Mascetti told friends and family she was considering purchasing a tired, mid-century home that hadn’t been updated in decades, they were less than enthusiastic. In fact, “everyone told me I was crazy,” says Mascetti. “They couldn’t see what I saw.”

    Others saw a Glendale house with no curb appeal, interiors so dated they still contained Cold War-area pink bathrooms, tiny inefficient windows, and a back yard with such a steep drop-off there was essentially no usable space.

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